Hyundai is famous worldwide for its mid-segment car design, Performace and Features. Just after the getting good Response from Fluidic Verna and new Hyundai Elantra company is now launched their new upgrade car Hyundai i30 Premium. Nonetheless, it’s another i30. This week’s test car.

The Hyundai i30 Fastback version hat perhaps attests Hyundai’s assurance as far as anything, because it is a car that is, in fact, a sign that Hyundai is happy to emulate’Premium’ car makers with a five-door coupe, catering to all those buyers wanting to earn a stylish statement than a streamlined family hatch or property can make, even though earnings expectations can’t be huge.

Remarkably, Hyundai has also been sharp with all the i30 Fastback’s pricing also, with the five-door coupe just #500 over the equal hatchback, which sounds something of a bargain.

But is the Fastback compromised by its styling? Is it as good a buy as the i30 Hatch or Estate? Then read our article till the below

Hyundai i30 Fastback Premium Inside

The i30 Premium Fastback is not a cutting-edge, bespoke take on the sensible i30 Hatch, with just small detail gaps at the front end, and a couple of piece at the back.

At the front, the Fastback understands a small tweak to the reduced grille, air intakes, and spoiler to make it all look a little more meaningful, which they perform, but you would need to understand your i30 Hatch unusually well to see the difference unless you had both sides by the side.

Hyundai i30 Interior

But proceed the profile view, and you can view the back’s a bit more, the roof has been squished, there are 18″ alloys, and it all ends up, when you get around the back, with a quite shapely rump with integrated spoiler and wraparound lights. It is not exactly cool and sexy, but it seems pretty stylish.

Inside, despite the premium aspirations of the exterior, is essentially exactly like the i30 Hatch. But that is not a terrible thing.

Everything appears, and feels bolted together; the chairs are comfy and flexible and, despite that coupe roofline, there is still enough headroom at the back to match in proper grown-ups. Thanks to the Fastback growing a little the boot bigger too, although getting stuff in and out isn’t as easy. It is all generally Hyundai; well thought out, functional and well outfitted.

Hyundai i30 Performance on Road

The new Hyundai i30 Performance on road is very good With more quick looks than the Hatch, you would expect the i30 Fastback to be a bit more dynamic. And it’s, but rather enjoy the extreme makeover it is a sensible range of tweaks and nips, as opposed to a significant overhaul.

The Fastback sits a bit lower compared to the Hatch and the suspension’s a tad stiffer which is sufficient to be noticeable if you want to push on. But thankfully the comparative calm of the Hatch is not lost in the procedure, and the Fastback remains at ease whatever road you are on, and copes very well with holes, lumps, and ridges.

Hyundai i30 Premium owner review

It’s still not a back street hungry coupe, but it stays flat enough when you are somewhat boisterous around an apex, goes where you point it and never really gets its knickers in a twist.

Under the bonnet is the same 1.4-liter petrol engine we had from the i30 Tourer we tested this past year, and it suits the Fastback just also.

It includes 138bhp and 178lb/ft of torque, not exactly a massive amount of get up and go to get a couple with pretensions, but it does an excellent job of rowing together, revving openly and feeling much sweeter than a diesel would. We got 38mpg in a week of combined motoring; owners will most likely see the right side of 40mpg.

This 1.4-liter gas came mated into a seven-speed DCT’box instead of the customary manual, which we thought could make it a great match once we saw it on the spec sheet. But we are not so convinced.

Sitting on a dual carriageway that the gearbox behaves well, changing a cog with possible throttle inputs if you’ve been balked and gets on with doing its materials. Much the same in slow trickling traffic also where it conserves your left leg.

But if you are on a combined drive of metropolitan and state roads it appears to be a bit dense at times (and it’s worse if you are an inveterate left foot breaker), trying to get at a high gear too soon and trying to decide if it needs to listen to you once you request it to receive a shake coming from a bend or in a junction.

It is not a wrong ‘box, and it’s probably partly down to driving style, but we’d give it a miss and stick with the guide.

But marginally disappointing DCT aside, the styling, the managing, and on-road manners are just quite Hyundai; no extremes and a good deal of competencies.

Hyundai i30 Premium Advantages & Disadvantages

The Hyundai i30 Fastback is a bit of an intriguing oddity, but at the end of a week plus a chunk of miles we had grown quite fond of it. And we started to see where it matches.

Hyundai i30 Verdicts

Hyundai would like you to consider it because the Porsche Panamera for the masses, but it is not that. Instead, it’s a family car for drivers that don’t think they are ready for the sensible label, and need something that does not shout have two kids, a mortgage, large bills along with a family Hatch’, but still want all of the advantages of sensible everything and a big guarantee. The i30 Fastback fits that bill.

It is just as functional as the i30 Hatch, together with as much space for kids and stuff and, despite its own mildly sporty coupe looks, it is still a simple non-challenging driver. However, it does seem better than the rather unexciting Hatch.

When we reviewed the i30 Tourer this past year we reckoned the modest #500 premium over the i30 Hatch was a bit of a no-brainer to get a more appealing, better-looking car. Ditto that the i30 Fastback.